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US Intelligence Community Careers: Analysis Job Descriptions
by Intelligence.gov - May 16, 2008
United States Intelligence COmmunity

The following occupations are found throughout the IC, but not necessarily at all IC member organizations.
 

Aeronautical Analyst
Aeronautical Imagery/Feature Analyst
Bathymetrist
Cartographer
Cartographic Technician
Collection Requirements Manager
Counterintelligence Analyst
Counterterrorism Analyst
Cryptanalyst
Economic Analyst
Financial Analyst
Geospatial Analyst
Geopositioning Cartographer
Imagery Analyst
Intelligence and Threat Support Analyst

Intelligence Specialist (Staff Management)
Intelligence Specialist (Foreign Material Acquisition and Exploitation)
Leadership Analyst
Marine Analyst
Medical Intelligence Analyst
Nautical Cartographic Analyst
Orbit Analyst
Political-Military Analyst
Regional Analyst
Scientific and Technical Analyst
Signals Analyst
Entry Level Professional


Aeronautical Analyst

What kinds of duties and tasks do Aeronautical Analysts typically perform?
Aeronautical Analysts collect, analyze, and evaluate aeronautical data from worldwide data and imagery sources. They convert that data into digital and graphic formats for use in supporting all phases of flight operations. Individuals use their knowledge of all phases of flight including planning, en route, and terminal. In addition, Aeronautical Analysts use computer systems and specialized software to maintain specialized databases and extract aeronautical information from imagery to support a wide variety of products. These analysts work cooperatively with their counterparts in the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the National Ocean Service (NOS), and many foreign aeronautical offices to provide timely, accurate data and products.

What kinds of skills and knowledge do Aeronautical Analysts typically need to do their work?
Aeronautical Analysts typically possess general knowledge of engineering and technology, physics, mathematics, English language, administration and management, and design. More specific knowledge areas include aeronautical science, cultural area studies, cartography, computer science, earth science, geography, intelligence analysis, international affairs, and intelligence collection. General skill areas include mathematics, science, active learning, technology design, reading comprehension, quality control analysis, critical thinking, operations analysis, coordination, and writing. Specific skills include production problem solving, data and statistical analysis, predictive intelligence judgments, imagery analysis and exploitation, and scanning and digitizing. For a complete description of skill and knowledge requirements, please review the job vacancy announcements posted on Community members' websites.

What kinds of education, licenses, and certifications are typically required to work as an Aeronautical Analyst?
Intelligence Community agencies typically prefer applicants for Aeronautical Analyst positions to have at least a Bachelor's degree. Aeronautical Analysts often have backgrounds as military or civilian pilots, navigators, and air traffic controllers.

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Aeronautical Imagery/Feature Analyst

What kinds of duties and tasks do Aeronautical Imagery/Feature Analysts typically perform?
Aeronautical Imagery/Feature Analysts support national security objectives and DoD aeronautical information products. This requires them to extract and evaluate aeronautical and geospatial information from a variety of imagery or other data sources. In addition, they validate information by comparing imagery and collateral sources to maintain the databases of aeronautical, intelligence, vertical obstruction, and chart feature data. These important functions support the safety of flight. Aeronautical Imagery/Feature Analysts provide input to national level tasking processes and requirements and coordinate appropriately with national and international agencies involved in similar work. Together, they investigate production issues and develop process improvements that affect the overall quality of aeronautical products and information in accordance with ISO 9001 certification requirements.

What kinds of skills and knowledge do Aeronautical Imagery/Feature Analysts typically need to do their work?
Aeronautical Imagery/Feature Analysts typically possess knowledge of photo interpretation techniques, imagery analysis techniques, imagery mensuration techniques, and feature extraction techniques. Skill areas include imagery analysis and exploitation, data and statistical analysis, predictive intelligence judgments, testing and evaluation, and geospatial data manipulation. For a more detailed description of skill and knowledge requirements, please check with Community member agencies.

What kinds of education, licenses, and certifications are typically required to work as an Aeronautical Imagery/Feature Analyst?
Intelligence Community agencies typically prefer applicants for Aeronautical Imagery/Feature Analyst positions to have at least a Bachelor's degree in an earth science or closely related area such as cartography, environmental science, or geography; in a technical area such as computer science, aeronautical sciences, or physical science; or in a liberal arts area such as cultural area studies or international affairs. Other degrees are also considered. Successful applicants often possess civilian or military operational flight experience as a captain, pilot, co-pilot, or navigation instructor; civilian or military air traffic controller experience; or civilian or military experience in the aeronautical field, which involved the acquisition, collection, selection, analysis, and preparation of reliable aeronautical information on navigation and related operations.

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Bathymetrist

What kinds of duties and tasks do Bathymetrists typically perform?
Bathymetrists analyze, evaluate, and correct raw bathymetric (depth) data. They populate and maintain this data in multi-agency databases for use across the Intelligence Community.

What kinds of skills and knowledge do Bathymetrists typically need to do their work?
Bathymetrists typically possess knowledge of bathymetry, trigonometry, and photo interpretation techniques. General skill areas include geospatial data integration, geospatial information processing, geospatial source analysis, research and information gathering, and data and statistical analysis. For a complete description of skill and knowledge requirements, please check with Community member agencies.

What kinds of education, licenses, and certifications are typically required to work as a Bathymetrist?
Intelligence Community agencies typically prefer applicants for Bathymetrist positions to have at least a Bachelor's degree in one of the following disciplines: astronomy, cartography, computer science, cultural area studies, environmental science, forestry, geodesy, geography (physical, political, demographic, or regional), geospatial information systems, geospatial information sciences, geology, geophysics, hydrology, imagery science, international affairs, marine science, meteorology, photogrammetry, physical science, remote sensing, or other closely related disciplines.

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Cartographer

What kinds of duties and tasks do Cartographers typically perform?
Cartographers collect, generate, and analyze imagery intelligence and geospatial information. Some of their most important responsibilities include geospatial data manipulation, conversion, and transfer; geospatial product development; imagery manipulation; mathematical and geodetic analysis, testing, and evaluation; and database and software design. Throughout their careers, Cartographers may use their expertise in several different disciplines including cartography, geology, earth sciences, astronomy, geodesy, navigation, photogrammetry, computer science, physical geography, and other related sciences.

What kinds of skills and knowledge do Cartographers typically need to do their work?
Cartographers typically possess general knowledge of cartography, computer science, geodesy, geology, photogrammetry, remote sensing, oceanography, geography, land surveying, geophysics, and astronomy. General skill areas include mathematics, operations analysis, reading comprehension, complex problem solving, equipment selection, critical thinking, and science. More specific skills include quality assurance, geospatial data manipulation, photo interpretation, hardcopy geospatial product editing, imagery manipulation, and scanning/digitizing. For a complete description of skill and knowledge requirements, please review the job vacancy announcements posted on Community members' websites.

What kinds of education, licenses, and certifications are typically required to work as a Cartographer?
Intelligence Community agencies typically prefer applicants for Cartographer positions to have at least at Bachelor's degree.

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Cartographic Technician

What kinds of duties and tasks do Cartographic Technicians typically perform?
Cartographic Technicians research, extract, attribute, symbolize, and format geospatial information. In addition, they verify the quality, accuracy, and currency of this information.

What kinds of skills and knowledge do Cartographic Technicians typically need to do their work?
Cartographic Technicians typically possess knowledge of cartographic drafting techniques, color separation procedures, digitizing techniques, and feature extraction techniques. General skill areas include hardcopy and softcopy geospatial product editing, scanning/digitizing, geospatial data manipulation, and imagery manipulation. For a more detailed description of skill and knowledge requirements, please check with individual Community member agencies.

What kinds of education, licenses, and certifications are typically required to work as a Cartographic Technician?
Please check back later for updated information on education requirements for this occupation.

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Collection Requirements Manager

What kinds of duties and tasks do Collection Requirements Managers typically perform?
Collection Requirements Managers are involved in a range of activities including developing plans and strategies for collection and inter- and intra-agency coordination of collection requirements. They act as a liaison and provide representation on requirements to agency and Intelligence Community collection activities, working groups, and resource allocation boards. In addition, Collection Requirements Managers analyze and interpret collection statistics to identify and assess trends; evaluate collection assets and methods for satisfying collection needs; and make recommendations to long-range collection planners.

What kinds of skills and knowledge do Collection Requirements Managers typically need to do their work?
Collection Requirements Managers typically possess knowledge of one or more of the natural or social sciences, engineering, or military science. They also have knowledge of one or more disciplines in the collection requirements programs (e.g., Human Intelligence, Signals Intelligence, Imagery Intelligence), mathematics, history and archeology, and geology. General skill areas include critical thinking, monitoring, coordination, systems analysis, mathematics, active learning, and science. For a complete description of skill and knowledge requirements, please check with individual Community member agencies.

What kinds of education, licenses, and certifications are typically required to work as a Collection Requirements Manager?
Please check back later for updated information on education requirements for this occupation.

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Counterintelligence Analyst

What kinds of duties and tasks do Counterintelligence Analysts typically perform?
Counterintelligence Analysts identify, monitor, and analyze the efforts of foreign intelligence entities against U.S. persons, activities, and interests. Their efforts support U.S. policymakers and provide tactical analysis and advice for clandestine operations by producing strategic analysis. They also produce a range of current and longer-term intelligence products, and brief key U.S. policymakers.

What kinds of skills and knowledge do Counterintelligence Analysts typically need to do their work?
Counterintelligence Analysts typically possess knowledge of geography, English, history and archeology, and philosophy and theology. For some agencies, foreign language skills are also helpful. General skill areas include speaking, critical thinking, active learning, social perceptiveness, reading comprehension, writing, and complex problem solving. For more detailed information on skill and knowledge requirements, please check the job vacancy announcements posted on the Community member websites.

What kinds of education, licenses, and certifications are typically required to work as a Counterintelligence Analyst?
Intelligence Community agencies typically prefer applicants for Counterintelligence Analyst positions to have a Bachelor's or more advanced degree in international affairs, national security, international business, electrical engineering, foreign area studies, or political science. Successful applicants often have foreign area studies degrees and have proficiency in at least one language in their area.

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Counterterrorism Analyst

What kinds of duties and tasks do Counterterrorism Analysts typically perform?
Counterterrorism Analysts perform and lead the performance of all-source analysis of terrorist groups' activities and actions against U.S. (specifically DoD) interests. They assess developments related to terrorism worldwide, and support U.S. policymakers by monitoring and assessing the leadership, motivations, plans, and intentions of foreign terrorist groups and their state and nonstate sponsors. In addition, Counterterrorism Analysts provide current and longer-term intelligence products; brief key U.S. policymakers; may provide tactical analytical support to law enforcement and intelligence operations; and provide intelligence collection recommendations in support of contingency and operational planning.

What kinds of skills and knowledge do Counterterrorism Analysts typically need to do their work?
Counterterrorism Analysts typically possess knowledge of geography, English, history and archeology, and philosophy and theology. For some agencies, foreign language skills are also helpful. General skill areas include speaking, critical thinking, active learning, social perceptiveness, reading comprehension, writing, and complex problem solving. For more detailed information on skill and knowledge requirements, please check the job vacancy announcements posted on Community members' websites.

What kinds of education, licenses, and certifications are typically required to work as a Counterterrorism Analyst?
Intelligence Community agencies typically prefer applicants for Counterterrorism Analyst positions to have a Bachelor's or more advanced degree in international affairs, national security studies, or related subjects.

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Cryptanalyst

What kinds of duties and tasks do Cryptanalysts typically perform?
Cryptanalysis is a core technical discipline within the Intelligence Community (IC). Cryptology involves deciphering coded messages without prior knowledge of the encryption method. "Code breakers", as they are known by laypersons, utilize mathematics, computer programming, engineering, and language skills as well as new technologies and creativity to solve tomorrow's problems today.

What kinds of skills and knowledge do Cryptanalysts typically need to do their work?
Cryptanalysts typically possess knowledge of geography, English, history and archeology, philosophy and theology, foreign language, mathematics, and computers and electronics. General skill areas include speaking, critical thinking, active learning, social perceptiveness, reading comprehension, writing, complex problem solving, and mathematics. For a more complete description of skill and knowledge requirements, please review the job vacancy announcements posted on Community members' websites.

What kinds of education, licenses, and certifications are typically required to work as a Cryptanalyst?
Intelligence Community agencies typically prefer applicants for Cryptanalyst positions to have a Bachelor's or more advanced degree. Common backgrounds include mathematics, computer programming, engineering, or foreign language. However, no specific major is targeted for Cryptanalysis; people with technical and non-technical degrees are hired.

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Economic Analyst

What kinds of duties and tasks do Economic Analysts typically perform?
Economic Analysts assess foreign economic and financial policies that affect U.S. security interests. They work closely with Political-Military Analysts throughout the Intelligence Community in producing current and longer-term intelligence products.

What kinds of skills and knowledge do Economic Analysts typically need to do their work?
Economic Analysts typically possess knowledge of economics, macroeconomics, mathematics, accounting, geography, English, history and archeology, and philosophy and theology. For some agencies, foreign language skills are also helpful. General skill areas include mathematics, speaking, critical thinking, active learning, social perceptiveness, reading comprehension, writing, and complex problem solving. For more specific information on skill and knowledge requirements, please check with individual Community member agencies.

What kinds of education, licenses, and certifications are typically required to work as an Economic Analyst?
Intelligence Community agencies typically prefer applicants for Economic Analyst positions to have a Bachelor's or more advanced degree in economics with an international or foreign area focus. Foreign area expertise and language abilities are desired.

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Financial Analyst

What kinds of duties and tasks do Financial Analysts typically perform?
Financial Analysts assess foreign financial issues-licit as well as illicit-that affect U.S. security interests. They also work closely with other analysts throughout the Intelligence Community in producing current and longer-term intelligence products.

What kinds of skills and knowledge do Financial Analysts typically need to do their work?
Financial Analysts typically possess knowledge of geography, English, history and archeology, philosophy and theology, mathematics, economics, and accounting. For some agencies, foreign language skills are also helpful. General skill areas include financial analysis, speaking, critical thinking, active learning, social perceptiveness, reading comprehension, writing, complex problem solving, and mathematics. Please check with Community member agencies for more detailed information on skill and knowledge requirements.

What kinds of education, licenses, and certifications are typically required to work as a Financial Analyst?
Intelligence Community agencies typically prefer applicants for Financial Analyst positions to have a Bachelor's or more advanced degree in economics, business administration, international management, or economic crimes management. Foreign area expertise and language abilities are desired. There is a particular need for specialists on international banking systems, financial markets, financial transactions, and financial instruments.

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Geopositioning Cartographer

What kinds of duties and tasks do Geopositioning Cartographers typically perform?
Geopositioning Cartographers perform image assessments, point selection, mensuration, and triangulation in order to increase the relative and absolute positioning accuracy of imagery. This service is performed for internal production customers, external contractors, and co-producers, in order to assure that final products can be generated to meet stringent customer accuracy requirements.

What kinds of skills and knowledge do Geopositioning Cartographers typically need to do their work?
Geopositioning Cartographers typically possess knowledge of orthorectification techniques, mensuration techniques, cartography, photogrammetry, and image processing procedures. General skill areas include mathematical and geodetic analysis, imagery manipulation, photo interpretation, testing and evaluation, and writing. For a detailed description of skill and knowledge requirements, please check with Community member agencies.

What kinds of education, licenses, and certifications are typically required to work as a Geopositioning Cartographer?
Intelligence Community agencies typically prefer applicants for Geopositioning Cartographer positions to have at least a Bachelor's degree in cartography or a related field.

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Geospatial Analyst

What kinds of duties and tasks do Geospatial Analysts typically perform?
Geospatial Analysts acquire, integrate, and synthesize geospatial intelligence and other information from a variety of different sources. This information is tailored to meet the needs of diverse customers and to support warfare strategies. Some of their responsibilities can include digital image processing; geospatial data reformatting, conversion, and transfer; photo interpretation; and hardware and software installation. In order to accomplish these duties, Geospatial Analysts regularly use geographic information systems and sophisticated software as well as previous knowledge of fields such as aeronautical navigation science, cartography, mathematics, computer science, programming analysis, and data analysis and extraction techniques.

What kinds of skills and knowledge do Geospatial Analysts typically need to do their work?
Geospatial Analysts typically possess general knowledge of geography, English, history and archeology, philosophy and theology, and computers and electronics. For some agencies, foreign language skills are also helpful. These professionals also typically have knowledge of cartography, analytical techniques (e.g., trend analysis, cause and effect, deductive/inductive reasoning), photogrammetry, hydrography, and geology. General skill areas include speaking, critical thinking, active learning, reading comprehension, writing, complex problem solving, science, and mathematics. More specific skills include spatial analysis, digital imagery processing, mensuration, geographic network analysis, application engineering development, testing and evaluation, and spectral analysis. For a complete description of skill and knowledge requirements, please review the job vacancy announcements posted on Community members' websites.

What kinds of education, licenses, and certifications are typically required to work as a Geospatial Analyst?
Intelligence Community agencies typically prefer applicants for Geospatial Analyst positions to have at least a Bachelor's degree.

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Imagery Analyst

What kinds of duties and tasks do Imagery Analysts typically perform?
Imagery Analysts interpret and analyze imagery to understand the military leadership, operating tactics, and infrastructure of foreign countries. They may solve imagery and geospatial problems by developing new tools or creating new capabilities from existing tools. They also engage in map reading and plotting activities.

What kinds of skills and knowledge do Imagery Analysts typically need to do their work?
Imagery Analysts typically possess general knowledge of geography, English, history and archeology, philosophy and theology, and computers and electronics. For some agencies, foreign language skills are also helpful. In addition, knowledge of image processing, sensor physics, geographic information systems, intelligence analysis tradecraft, and image interpretation principles is desirable. General skill areas include speaking, critical thinking, active learning, social perceptiveness, reading comprehension, writing, and complex problem solving. More specific skills include imagery analysis, product improvement, map reading and plotting, mensuration, collection planning and monitoring, and image interpretation. For a complete description of skill and knowledge requirements, please review the job vacancy announcements posted on Community members' websites.

What kinds of education, licenses, and certifications are typically required to work as an Imagery Analyst?
Intelligence Community agencies typically prefer applicants for Imagery Analyst positions to have at least a Bachelor's degree in one of the following disciplines: chemistry, cultural area studies, environmental health/science/protection, forestry, geodesy, combat arms operations, international economics, history, geology, military science, international affairs, political science, intelligence analysis, photogrammetry, imagery science, or geography.

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Intelligence and Threat Support Analyst

What kinds of duties and tasks do Intelligence and Threat Support Analysts typically perform?
The individual assignments and opportunities that are available to Intelligence and Threat Support Analysts are varied and highly specialized, but all share one important and exciting quality: they help protect the nation's security. Often the work involves the acquisition, receipt, evaluation and analysis, dissemination, and use of foreign intelligence and threat information having pertinence to research, combat and materiel developments, training and training developments, concepts doctrine and doctrinal developments, test and evaluation, readiness and sustainment, or employment of U.S. military forces and equipment. They can be involved in the identification of significant intelligence trends and may propose new or revised analytical efforts to alert policy makers to developments and to meet customer requirements. In addition, they might prepare written and oral assessments of current events based on the sophisticated collection, research, and analysis of classified and open source information.

What kinds of skills and knowledge do Intelligence and Threat Support Analysts typically need to do their work?
Intelligence and Threat Support Analysts typically have a basic understanding of the principles and procedures of research and modeling, and knowledge of geography, English, history and archeology, and philosophy and theology. General skill areas include speaking, critical thinking, active learning, social perceptiveness, reading comprehension, writing, complex problem solving, management of personnel resources, monitoring, and coordination. For a more complete description of skill and knowledge requirements, please check with individual Community member agencies.

What kinds of education, licenses, and certifications are typically required to work as an Intelligence and Threat Support Analyst?
Please check back later for updated information on education requirements for this occupation.

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Intelligence Specialist (Foreign Material Acquisition and Exploitation)

What kinds of duties and tasks do Intelligence Specialists (Foreign Material Acquisition and Exploitation) typically perform?
Intelligence Specialists working in the area of Foreign Material Acquisition and Exploitation are involved in resource management, test planning, and the coordination, delivery, and handling of foreign materiel. They are also responsible for intra- and inter-agency coordination required for the conduct of training, staff functions, and the creation and implementation of policy and guidance.

What kinds of skills and knowledge do Intelligence Specialists (Foreign Material Acquisition and Exploitation) typically need to do their work?
Intelligence Specialists working in the area of Foreign Material Acquisition and Exploitation typically possess knowledge of geography, English, history and archeology, philosophy and theology, and mathematics. For some agencies, foreign language skills are also helpful. General skill areas include speaking, critical thinking, active learning, social perceptiveness, reading comprehension, writing, complex problem solving, management of material resources, and coordination. For a more complete description of skill and knowledge requirements, please check the job vacancy announcements posted on Community members' websites.

What kinds of education, licenses, and certifications are typically required to work as an Intelligence Specialist (Foreign Material Acquisition and Exploitation)?
Please check back later for updated information on education requirements for this occupation.

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Intelligence Specialist (Staff Management)

What kinds of duties and tasks do Intelligence Specialists (Staff Management) typically perform?
Intelligence Specialists in Staff Management are involved in the oversight, policy development, planning, direction, program management, evaluation, and coordination required to execute intelligence programs. In addition, these professionals direct, plan, coordinate, monitor, interpret, and evaluate intelligence activities to assure compliance with policy and achieve mission goals and objectives.

What kinds of skills and knowledge do Intelligence Specialists (Staff Management) typically need to do their work?
Intelligence Specialists in Staff Management typically possess knowledge of geography, English, history and archeology, philosophy and theology, administration and management, and mathematics. For some agencies, foreign language skills are also helpful. General skill areas include speaking, critical thinking, active learning, social perceptiveness, reading comprehension, writing, complex problem solving, and management of financial and personnel resources. For a complete description of skill and knowledge requirements, please check with individual Community member agencies.

What kinds of education, licenses, and certifications are typically required to work as an Intelligence Specialist (Staff Management)?
Please check back later for updated information on education requirements for this occupation.

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Leadership Analyst

What kinds of duties and tasks do Leadership Analysts typically perform?
Leadership Analysts produce assessments of foreign leaders and other key decision-makers in the political, economic, science and technology, social, and cultural fields. These assessments are prepared at the request of senior U.S. policymakers in the executive and legislative branches to help them understand and effectively interact with their foreign counterparts.

What kinds of skills and knowledge do Leadership Analysts typically need to do their work?
Leadership Analysts typically possess knowledge of psychology, sociology, anthropology, geography, English, history and archeology, and philosophy and theology. For some agencies, foreign language skills are also helpful. General skill areas include financial analysis, speaking, critical thinking, active learning, social perceptiveness, reading comprehension, writing, complex problem solving, and science. For a comprehensive list of skill and knowledge requirements, please check with Community member agencies.

What kinds of education, licenses, and certifications are typically required to work as a Leadership Analyst?
Intelligence Community agencies typically prefer applicants for Leadership Analyst positions to have a Bachelor's or more advanced degree in international relations, political science, foreign area studies, history, or similar areas. Successful applicants often are proficient in a foreign language and possess foreign area knowledge through study, travel, or work abroad.

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Marine Analyst

What kinds of duties and tasks do Marine Analysts typically perform?
Marine Analysts specialize in military and commercial waterborne transportation with an emphasis on navigation safety. They make decisions to promote the safety of life at sea for military and commercial users of hydrographic data, products, and services. One of the most important responsibilities of Marine Analysts is to collect, evaluate, and compile all available navigational data for dissemination by early warning broadcast, hardcopy publication, digital media, and electronic access data files to enable any United States vessel to sail anywhere in the world safely. In doing so, Marine Analysts work cooperatively with counterparts in nearly all hydrographic offices worldwide.

What kinds of skills and knowledge do Marine Analysts typically need to do their work?
Marine Analysts typically have general knowledge of geography, English, history and archeology, philosophy and theology, transportation, physics, and mathematics. For some agencies, foreign language skills are also helpful. Additional knowledge areas include marine science, marine navigation, computer science, imagery analysis techniques, and bathymetry. General skill areas include speaking, critical thinking, active learning, reading comprehension, writing, complex problem solving, and science. More specific skills include source acquisition and exploitation, data and statistical analysis, and predictive intelligence judgments. For a more detailed description of skill and knowledge requirements, please check with Community member agencies.

What kinds of education, licenses, and certifications are typically required to work as a Marine Analyst?
Intelligence Community agencies typically prefer applicants for Marine Analyst positions to have at least a Bachelor's degree. Marine Analysts often come from backgrounds such as marine science, marine navigation, physics, mathematics, astronomy, geography, oceanography, meteorology, engineering, and cartography.

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Medical Intelligence Analyst

What kinds of duties and tasks do Medical Intelligence Analysts typically perform?
Medical Intelligence Analysts are responsible for assessing the foreign environmental situation, health care capabilities, disease prevalence, health infrastructure, and civilian and military healthcare.

What kinds of skills and knowledge do Medical Intelligence Analysts typically need to do their work?
Medical Intelligence Analysts typically possess knowledge of geography, English, history and archeology, philosophy and theology, medicine and dentistry, chemistry, and biology. For some agencies, foreign language skills are also helpful. General skill areas include speaking, critical thinking, active learning, social perceptiveness, reading comprehension, writing, complex problem solving, and science. For a more complete description of skill and knowledge requirements, please check with individual Community members.

What kinds of education, licenses, and certifications are typically required to work as a Medical Intelligence Analyst?
Medical Intelligence Analyst positions typically require a basic knowledge and understanding of one or more of the natural or social sciences, engineering, or military science but do not demand, as a primary qualification requirement, the full academic or other formal qualifications of that science (e.g., to be a fully qualified scientist, engineer, economist). Some agencies may prefer applicants with a Bachelor's degree.

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Nautical Cartographic Analyst

What kinds of duties and tasks do Nautical Cartographic Analysts typically perform?
Nautical Cartographic Analysts acquire, analyze, evaluate, and compile nautical products and mission specific data sets in support of mission requirements and navigation safety. These data sets come from a variety of sources including foreign nautical charts, foreign notice to mariners, imagery, bathymetry, publications, ship reports, and other forms of geospatial intelligence. In addition, Nautical Cartographic Analysts support maritime production through in-house geospatial production, contract administration, data management, and quality assurance. They ensure the quality, accuracy, and currency of nautical information produced either in-house or in cooperation with contractors and international co-producers for national, military, and civil customers.

What kinds of skills and knowledge do Nautical Cartographic Analysts typically need to do their work?
Nautical Cartographic Analysts typically possess knowledge of marine navigation principles and practices, digitizing techniques, feature extraction techniques, photo interpretation techniques, hydrographic surveying, and image processing procedures. General skill areas include geospatial data manipulation, imagery manipulation, database management, and data and statistical analysis. For a more detailed description of skill and knowledge requirements, please check with individual Community member agencies.

What kinds of education, licenses, and certifications are typically required to work as a Nautical Cartographic Analyst?
Intelligence Community agencies typically prefer applicants for Nautical Cartographic Analyst positions to have at least a Bachelor's degree in cartography or directly related sciences or mathematics.

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Orbit Analyst

What kinds of duties and tasks do Orbit Analysts typically perform?
Orbit Analysts use orbital mechanics and network systems analysis to acquire, process, and analyze satellite data. They also handle technical and logistical details pertinent to remote command and control of a worldwide network of satellite tracking stations. They often track the movement of such satellites along with celestial bodies as they move over time. They analyze satellite ranging and timing information in order to identify anomalies in both real-time and post-fit scenarios.

What kinds of skills and knowledge do Orbit Analysts typically need to do their work?
Orbit Analysts typically possess general knowledge of mathematics, physics, satellite geodesy, and global positioning system (GPS) theory. General skill areas include mathematics, data and statistical analysis, writing, and computer applications development. For a detailed description of skill and knowledge requirements, please check with individual Community member agencies.

What kinds of education, licenses, and certifications are typically required to work as an Orbit Analyst?
Intelligence Community agencies typically prefer applicants for Orbit Analyst positions to have at least a Bachelor's degree. Coursework in the following disciplines is desired: geodesy, mathematics including differential and integral calculus, physics, astronomy, engineering science, surveying, cartography, photogrammetry, geology, or geophysics.

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Political-Military Analyst

What kinds of duties and tasks do Political-Military Analysts typically perform?
Political-Military Analysts support U.S. policymakers by evaluating the goals and motivations of foreign governments and entities. In order to do this, they examine the entity's culture, values, society and ideologies, resources and capabilities, political and decision-making processes, the strengths and weaknesses of their strategies for achieving their goals, and the implications of all of the above for U.S. interests.

What kinds of skills and knowledge do Political-Military Analysts typically need to do their work?
Political-Military Analysts typically have knowledge of geography, English, history and archeology, philosophy and theology, sociology, anthropology, and psychology. For some agencies, foreign language skills are also helpful. General skills include speaking, critical thinking, active learning, social perceptiveness, reading comprehension, writing, complex problem solving, and science. For a more complete description of skill and knowledge requirements, please check the job vacancy announcements posted on Community members' websites.

What kinds of education, licenses, and certifications are typically required to work as a Political-Military Analyst?
Intelligence Community agencies typically require applicants for Political-Military Analyst positions to have a Bachelor's or more advanced degree in one of the following disciplines: foreign area study, international relations, political science, history, international security affairs, military studies, or national security affairs. Some agencies also seek candidates with degrees in demography, anthropology, geography, comparative politics, and media studies, particularly when combined with an international focus. Previous foreign travel or residency is a plus. Military experience as an officer in an operations or Intelligence Command may be helpful for some positions.

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Regional Analyst

What kinds of duties and tasks do Regional Analysts typically perform?
Regional Analysts conduct research and gather information; identify intelligence gaps; interpret and evaluate information from multiple (and sometimes contradictory) sources; monitor trends and events related to a particular country or issue; and prepare written and oral assessments based on current events. They frequently use their strong knowledge of a particular country or region, including its geography along with their deep understanding of political events, U.S. foreign policy, and foreign language capabilities.

What kinds of skills and knowledge do Regional Analysts typically need to do their work?
Regional Analysts typically possess knowledge of geography, English, history and archeology, and philosophy and theology. For some agencies, foreign language skills are also helpful. General skills areas include speaking, critical thinking, active learning, social perceptiveness, reading comprehension, writing, and complex problem solving. More specific skills include research and information gathering, data and statistical analysis, predictive intelligence judgments, and analytical innovation and shortfall identification. For a more complete description of skill and knowledge requirements, please review the job vacancy announcements posted on Community members' websites.

What kinds of education, licenses, and certifications are typically required to work as a Regional Analyst?
Intelligence Community agencies typically prefer applicants for Regional Analyst positions to have at least a Bachelor's degree in a job-related field, such as political science, regional studies, international affairs, geography, economics, engineering, or physical or life sciences.

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Scientific and Technical Analyst

What kinds of duties and tasks do Scientific and Technical Analysts typically perform?
Scientific and Technical Analysts apply their scientific and technical knowledge to solve complex intelligence problems and present their assessments to senior policymakers. More specifically, they analyze challenging national security issues such as foreign weapons development, weapons proliferation, information warfare, and emerging technologies. Scientific and Technical Analysts may be involved in one or more of the following intelligence disciplines: Signals Intelligence, Imagery Intelligence, Counterintelligence, Human Intelligence, Measurements and Signatures Intelligence, and All-Source Intelligence.

What kinds of skills and knowledge do Scientific and Technical Analysts typically need to do their work?
Scientific and Technical Analysts typically possess knowledge of the systems, procedures, and methods of analyzing, compiling, reporting, and disseminating intelligence data. They also possess general knowledge of geography, English, history and archeology, philosophy and theology, physics, chemistry, and biology. For some agencies, foreign language skills are also helpful. General skill areas include planning and organizing, speaking, critical thinking, active learning, social perceptiveness, reading comprehension, writing, complex problem solving, science, mathematics, computers and electronics, and engineering and technology. Please check with Community members for more detailed information on skill and knowledge requirements.

What kinds of education, licenses, and certifications are typically required to work as a Scientific and Technical Analyst?
Intelligence Community agencies typically prefer applicants for Scientific and Technical Analyst positions to have a Bachelor's or more advanced degree in an engineering discipline (e.g., aerospace, mechanical, electrical), computer science, physics, mathematics, chemistry, biology, biotechnology, or related disciplines.

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Signals Analyst

What kinds of duties and tasks do Signals Analysts typically perform?
Signals Analysis is recognized as one of the core technical areas that must be maintained in order for the Intelligence Community (IC) to accomplish its mission. Signals Analysts analyze and interpret foreign signals intelligence (SIGINT) from around the world. Their goal is to identify the purpose, content, and user of signals.

What kinds of skills and knowledge do Signals Analysts typically need to do their work?
Signals Analysts typically possess knowledge of telecommunications, computer and electronics, mathematics, and engineering and technology. Typical skills include operation monitoring, active listening, operation and control, speaking, and mathematics. For a more complete description of skill and knowledge requirements, please review the job vacancy announcements posted on Community members' websites.

What kinds of education, licenses, and certifications are typically required to work as a Signals Analyst?
Intelligence Community agencies typically prefer applicants for Signals Analyst positions to have a background in computer science, mathematics, engineering, or related technical disciplines.

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Entry-Level

What kinds of duties and tasks do Entry-Level professionals typically perform?
Entry-Level professionals in the Analysis Career assist intelligence specialists by performing work in connection with intelligence data collection, analysis, evaluation, interpretation, and dissemination of information on political, economic, social, cultural, physical, geographic, scientific, or military conditions, trends, and forces in foreign and domestic areas that affect national security. Entry-level positions include, among others, Intelligence Assistants, Intelligence Technicians, and Information Service Specialists.

What kinds of skills and knowledge do Entry-Level professionals typically need to do their work?
Entry-level professionals typically possess clerical knowledge, as well as reading comprehension and service orientation skills. For a complete description of skill and knowledge requirements, please check the job vacancy announcements posted on Community members' websites.

What kinds of education, licenses, and certifications are typically required to work as an Entry-Level professional?
 

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